Cecily's Advocacy Workshop 2016-2017


This is an archive webpage for Cecily's Advocacy Workshop 2016-2017. If you would like to learn more about the 2017-2018 Workshop please click here.
 
 
Processing Speed, Learning and the Brain
Ellen B. Braaten, PhD
Director, Learning and Emotional Assessment Program at Massachusetts General Hospital


Dr. Ellen Braaten is the Director of the Learning and Emotional Assessment Program (LEAP) at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Track Director of the Child Psychology Training Program at MGH/Harvard Medical School. She is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Braaten is widely recognized as an expert in the field of pediatric neuropsychological and psychological assessment, particularly in the areas of assessing learning disabilities and attentional disorders.
 
Dr. Braaten is the co-author of Straight Talk About Psychological Testing for Kids, a book that has become a classic for parents and professionals. She has also written The Child Clinician’s Report-Writing Handbook, which has been called “The most comprehensive child assessment handbook available.” Her most recent book for parents is entitled How to Find Mental Health Care for Your Child, published by the American Psychological Association. Dr. Braaten brings to McLean School’s Cecily’s Advocacy Workshop a depth of understanding of many facets of learning and will share information and insights about processing speed as reflected in her book, Bright Kids Who Can’t Keep Up, in her keynote address. She will offer practical tips on the adolescent brain in her workshop. We are thrilled to welcome Dr. Braaten to McLean School.
 
Anxiety and the Impact on Learning
Daniel Pine, MD
Chief, Emotion and Development Branch (E & D) and Chief, Section on Development and Affective Neuroscience (SDAN), National Institute of Mental Health Intramural Research Program



 It can be particularly challenging to achieve positive learning and educational outcomes when dealing with anxiety. Dr. Daniel S. Pine is Chief, Section on Development and Affective Neuroscience in the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Intramural Research Program and he will share information, ideas, and insights in the area of anxiety.  His areas of expertise include biological and pharmacological aspects of mood, anxiety, and behavioral disorders in children, as well as classification of psychopathology across the lifespan. Currently, his research group is examining the degree to which mood and anxiety disorders in children and adolescents are associated with underlying abnormalities in the amygdala, prefrontal cortex, and associated brain regions.  Dr. Pine has served as the Chair of the Psychopharmacologic Drug Advisory Committee for the Food and Drug Administration and Chair of the Child and Adolescent Diagnosis Group for the DSM-5 Task Force. He has received many awards, including the Joel Elkes Award from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, the Blanche Ittelson Award from the American Psychiatric Association, and the Ruane Prize from the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation. As so many parents, students, and teachers struggle to better understand anxiety and the way it impacts learning and performance, we are excited to welcome Dr. Pine to McLean School.
 

Workshop PowerPoint Presentations and Videos

List of 4 items.

  • ADHD: How The Brain and Behavior Impact Learning and Strategies to Support the ADHD Learner

    Alan Zametkin, MD
    Chesapeake ADHD Center
    Molly R. Zametkin, LGSW
    Northstar Academy



    If you ask a parent, teacher or even a student if they know anyone with ADHD, the odds are pretty high that they will say "yes." If you ask the same group if they understand what ADHD means, the odds are pretty high that most will not know much about the term. In this workshop, participants will gain a deeper understanding of ADHD and ways to support the ADHD learner. Dr Zametkin is an internationally recognized authority on ADHD who has worked both as a psychiatrist in private practice for the past 32 years in Bethesda, MD, while serving as a clinical investigator at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) where he evaluated, studied and treated children and adults with ADHD for 30 years. Most recently, he spent three years treating military families at Bethesda Naval Hospital and Ft. Meade. Unlike many psychiatrists that only provide medication management, Dr. Zametkin provides the full range of treatment in his work with children, adolescents and adults with ADHD. He actively involves parents in the treatment process, providing parent training and family therapy when called for, and provides individual therapy to patients across the lifespan. Dr. Zametkin will be joined by his daughter Molly, who herself has become an outspoken advocate for the ADHD learner.
  • Brain-based Strategies for Math Success: How Everyone Can Grow Number Sense, Develop a Positive Emotional Attitude to Math, and Improve Their Mathematical Thinking

    Linda Kern-Pelzman, PhD
    Director of Academic Program, McLean School
    Robyn Wise
    Middle School Math Teacher, McLean School 
    Sarah Baxter
    Lower and Middle School Math Learning Specialist, McLean School
     
     
    Just the word “math” itself can induce sweaty palms and a rapid heartbeat in some of us. Yet current brain science has proven not only that everyone can grow number sense and be “good” at math, but also that we can all experience the joy and confidence that comes from math success! In this interactive workshop, participants will learn how to change the way they think about math, sample some games and strategies that can be used in the classroom and at home, and leave with a deeper understanding of how to make friends with math.
  • Dyslexia and Ways to Support Dyslexic Learners

    Laurie Moloney, CLAT
    Academic Language Therapy Association
    President, DC Area Branch of the International Dyslexia Association



    One in five students has dyslexia, a neurologically-based, often familial, learning difference that interferes with the acquisition and processing of language. Dyslexia is manifested, in varying degrees of severity, by difficulties with receptive and expressive language, phonological processing, reading, handwriting, spelling, expressive writing, and sometimes mathematics. Despite the best classroom instruction and home support, some students’ difficulties persist, leading to problems with self-esteem, behavior, and academic progress.  This session will describe dyslexia, its signs and symptoms, and the crucial components effective interventions must have in order change the trajectory of the lives of students -- from the mildly involved to the severely dyslexic. Laurie's areas of expertise include teaching students to read, handwrite, and spell fluently; take notes from textbooks, literature, and lecture; enlarge their vocabulary exponentially through the study of Latin and Greek morphemes; read and think critically; write well; manage their time and school materials effectively; remember what they learn through novel memory strategies; and self-advocate. She is motivated by the belief that literacy is a fundamental civil right unfairly denied to millions of Americans for intolerable reasons.
  • Executive Functioning in the Developing Brain

    Rebecca Resnik, PhD
    Rebecca Resnik and Associates, LLC



    As the brain matures, the "Executive Functions" (those special capacities that make us uniquely human), develop in surprising ways. Most of us already know executive functions are essential to learning and doing school work, but that is far from the whole story. New research in brain development illuminates how the executive functions also govern critical aspects that make each of us who we are, including emotion, decision making, and (eventually) wisdom. In this presentation, Dr. Rebecca Resnik brings recent neuroscience research about Executive Functioning into the everyday "real world" of raising and teaching children. Implications for setting expectations, communicating, and facilitating wise decision making will be discussed.

Unlocking Potential: Learning and the Brain

Cecily’s Advocacy Workshop 

Saturday, November 12, 2016


Each year, McLean School invites both nationally celebrated and community-based experts on learning and development for a symposium highlighting new research and best practices in fostering growth for K-12 students. Now in its 8th year, Cecily’s Advocacy Workshop has grown as a key resource in the Washington metro area, attracting an audience of over 300 parents, educators, and child development professionals.
 
This workshop is named in memory of Cecily Kodis Kaufman, a devoted McLean School parent, loving advocate, and mother. Cecily was an inspirational member of the McLean School family. For many years, she was a steadfast member of the Parents Association Executive Board. Cecily left her mark on the hearts of all who knew her by her selfless, giving spirit to the McLean School community.

Co-Chairs, Jeanett Yonemoto (Jillian ’27) and Lillian Hagen (Ben '21) thank the keynote speakers, Dr. Ellen Braaten, and Dr. Daniel Pine, and the workshop presenters for this incredible day.

Workshop Session 1 (click titles for description)

List of 6 items.

  • Dyslexia and Ways to Support Dyslexic Learners

    Laurie Moloney, CLAT
    Academic Language Therapy Association
    President, DC Area Branch of the International Dyslexia Association

    One in five students has dyslexia, a neurologically-based, often familial, learning difference that interferes with the acquisition and processing of language. Dyslexia is manifested, in varying degrees of severity, by difficulties with receptive and expressive language, phonological processing, reading, handwriting, spelling, expressive writing, and sometimes mathematics. Despite the best classroom instruction and home support, some students’ difficulties persist, leading to problems with self-esteem, behavior, and academic progress.  This session will describe dyslexia, its signs and symptoms, and the crucial components effective interventions must have in order change the trajectory of the lives of students -- from the mildly involved to the severely dyslexic. Laurie's areas of expertise include teaching students to read, handwrite, and spell fluently; take notes from textbooks, literature, and lecture; enlarge their vocabulary exponentially through the study of Latin and Greek morphemes; read and think critically; write well; manage their time and school materials effectively; remember what they learn through novel memory strategies; and self-advocate. She is motivated by the belief that literacy is a fundamental civil right unfairly denied to millions of Americans for intolerable reasons.
     
     
  • Executive Functioning in the Developing Brain

    Rebecca Resnik, PhD
    Rebecca Resnik and Associates, LLC

    As the brain matures, the "Executive Functions" (those special capacities that make us uniquely human), develop in surprising ways. Most of us already know executive functions are essential to learning and doing school work, but that is far from the whole story. New research in brain development illuminates how the executive functions also govern critical aspects that make each of us who we are, including emotion, decision making, and (eventually) wisdom. In this presentation, Dr. Rebecca Resnik brings recent neuroscience research about Executive Functioning into the everyday "real world" of raising and teaching children. Implications for setting expectations, communicating, and facilitating wise decision making will be discussed.
  • Anxiety

    Daniel Pine, MD
    Chief, Emotion and Development Branch (E & D) and Chief, Section on Development and Affective Neuroscience (SDAN), National Institute of Mental Health Intramural Research Program
     
    Anxiety can have a significant, and often devastating impact on learning and on life. While much attention has been paid to the effect of anxiety on adults, researchers have more recently begun to focus on anxiety in children, including its effect on performance, overall happiness, and the seeming increase in its prevalence. In this workshop, Dr. Daniel Pine will share his insights and expertise, based on many years of research and practice, about anxiety. Currently, he and his colleagues are examining the degree to which mood and anxiety disorders in children and adolescents are associated with underlying abnormalities in the amygdala, prefrontal cortex and other brain regions. Prior to joining the NIMH, Dr. Pine spent 10 years at the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in the New York State Psychiatric Institute and the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University.
     
  • Mindfulness - How it Can Improve Learning

    Frankie Engelking, MA
    Director of Student & Community Wellness, McLean School
     
    Time Magazine recently released a publication devoted entirely to Mindfulness. The world is beginning to take notice of what McLean School has known for quite some time - that Mindfulness has great benefit. Mindfulness enhances learning by quieting the brain to improve focus and stimulating the brain to improve retention and memory. This workshop will share new brain research and provide strategies that will empower your child to be available for learning.
  • Brain Training: How Biofeedback and Neurofeedback Can Help Students Feel Calm and Focused

    Liz Schroth, MA, BCC, LCPC
    Transitional Insights, LLC
    Robin Moore, LCPC, BCC, BCN
    Educational Insights, LLC
    Katherine Thorn LCPC, BCN
    Wellness in Mind, LLC

    One of the keys to optimal learning is the brain’s ability to regulate itself and stay in a calm and focused state. Unfortunately, the fast paced and competitive environment facing many of our children and teens today can create high levels of stress that negatively impact the brain, contributing to attention issues, anxiety, insomnia, headaches, and mood instabilities. Neurofeedback, originally developed for NASA pilots, and biofeedback are non-invasive treatments that help retrain brain waves and biological signals so that the brain and body can learn to regulate themselves. Parents and teachers will come away from this workshop with a deeper understanding of how these practices can help students, as well as some easy techniques they can apply immediately.
  • College Ready and College Bound For the Student Who Learns Differently

    Hannah Serota, MEd
    College Counselor, McLean School

    Marcy Ritzert, MEd
    Associate Director of Admission at Muskingum University

    For students with challenges, the transition from high school to college can be daunting.Yet, with preparation and insight, students with learning differences can achieve high levels of college success. In this workshop, we will discuss the kinds of support colleges offer, the critical skill set college-level learning requires, factors in finding an appropriate fit, and the process of documentation required for accommodation on SAT/ACT tests, and on the college campus. 

Workshop Session 2 (click titles for description)

List of 6 items.

  • Brain-based Strategies for Math Success: How Everyone Can Grow Number Sense, Develop a Positive Emotional Attitude to Math, and Improve Their Mathematical Thinking

    Linda Kern-Pelzman, PhD
    Director of Academic Program, McLean School
    Robyn Wise
    Middle School Math Teacher, McLean School 
    Sarah Baxter
    Lower and Middle School Math Learning Specialist, McLean School

    Just the word “math” itself can induce sweaty palms and a rapid heartbeat in some of us. Yet current brain science has proven not only that everyone can grow number sense and be “good” at math, but also that we can all experience the joy and confidence that comes from math success! In this interactive workshop, participants will learn how to change the way they think about math, sample some games and strategies that can be used in the classroom and at home, and leave with a deeper understanding of how to make friends with math.

  • ADHD: How The Brain and Behavior Impact Learning and Strategies to Support the ADHD Learner

    Alan Zametkin, MD
    Chesapeake ADHD Center
    Molly R. Zametkin, LGSW
    Northstar Academy

    If you ask a parent, teacher or even a student if they know anyone with ADHD, the odds are pretty high that they will say "yes." If you ask the same group if they understand what ADHD means, the odds are pretty high that most will not know much about the term. In this workshop, participants will gain a deeper understanding of ADHD and ways to support the ADHD learner. Dr Zametkin is an internationally recognized authority on ADHD who has worked both as a psychiatrist in private practice for the past 32 years in Bethesda, MD, while serving as a clinical investigator at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) where he evaluated, studied and treated children and adults with ADHD for 30 years. Most recently, he spent three years treating military families at Bethesda Naval Hospital and Ft. Meade. Unlike many psychiatrists that only provide medication management, Dr. Zametkin provides the full range of treatment in his work with children, adolescents and adults with ADHD. He actively involves parents in the treatment process, providing parent training and family therapy when called for, and provides individual therapy to patients across the lifespan. Dr. Zametkin will be joined by his daughter Molly, who herself has become an outspoken advocate for the ADHD learner.
  • The Adolescent Brain

    Ellen Braaten, PhD
    Director, Learning and Emotional Assessment Program at Massachusetts General Hospital

    If you’re a parent of a middle or high school student, you might find that the rules your parents had for you no longer apply. Today’s tweens and teens lives are more complicated than ever but their developing brains are frequently not capable of meeting the (sometimes inappropriate) challenges. Dr. Braaten is an expert in child and adolescent development and in this workshop she will help participants understand the significant changes the brain undergoes during adolescence in order to help parents understand the challenges teens face in their learning, social and emotional growth, as well as practical tips for helping them cope.
  • The Out-of-Sync Child and Sensory Processing

    Carol Stock Kranowitz, MA 
    Out-of-Sync Child, Inc.

    Some children and teenagers do not behave as we expect – not because they won’t, but because they can’t. Looking at out-of- sync behavior through “sensory goggles,” teachers, parents, and other professionals can recognize — and address — inefficient sensory processing that interferes with young people’s full participation in daily life. Join well-known author and educator Carol Stock Kranowitz, in this workshop designed to help participants gain a greater understaning of sensory processing and ways to support students who may exhibit related behaviors. Carol taught at St. Columba’s Nursery School in Washington, DC for 25 years and helped to develop an innovative program to screen young children for Sensory Processing Disorder.  

     
  • Does This Have to be So Hard? Creating Healthy Family and Sibling Relationships with Children Who Learn Differently

    Sally Neuberger, LCSW-C
    Sally Neuberger Therapy

    The complex road map for children with learning differences is not over when the school day ends. Navigating family life for children with unique learning styles can be even more complicated at home and almost always impacts parents,siblings and family functioning. This workshop will provide attendees with 10 tools for creating a calm/fun household that encourage healthy sibling and parent child relationships. Sally Neuberger has been providing counseling services to children with learning differences and their families for the past 30 years. As head of the counseling department the Katherine Thomas School for 20 years, she created and designed social pragmatics groups, and community/parent workshop presentations. Now in private practice in Rockville MD, Ms.Neuberger works with children, young adolescents and their parents around developing healthy social emotional behaviors at school and at home.
  • Building a Home: Adoption, Learning, Identity, and Culture

    Vittoria DeLucia, MD
    University of Maryland Medical Center, Psychiatric Resident

    Much of the focus on learning involves the messages that are consciously taught; however, the vast majority of what children learn are encoded in non-verbal communication. “Building a Home: Adoption, Learning, Identity, and Culture” explores the pre-verbal experience of adoption through the lens of attachment theory, behavioral psychology, and cultural considerations. With this foundation, a more refined understanding can be developed regarding identity development. This workshop will include case examples from both clinical and non-clinical settings.

2016 Cecily's Advocacy Workshop
Click here to see the Presentatins and Videos:


  


Thank You to Our Sponsors:

K-12 College Preparatory School Supporting Bright Students’ Individual Strengths and Challenges.

McLean School is an independent, co-educational, K-12 day school serving Maryland, Washington, and Virginia. McLean has for over sixty years been helping students realize their full potential by providing a comprehensive college preparatory program that emphasizes small classes and differentiated instruction. We embrace both traditional learners and ones with mild to moderate learning challenges – dyslexia, dysgraphia, dyscalculia, ADHD, and challenges related to anxiety and executive functioning. Many of our students excel in some areas while benefiting from support in others.
 
8224 Lochinver Lane, Potomac, Maryland 20854  301.299.8277  admission@mcleanschool.org